waffleghost

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crocket:

Gaston Rébuffat atop the aiguille du Roc, Mont Blanc massif, France (1944)

(Source: dragittoshore)

16 February 2014 reblog: dragittoshore


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sctttnnnt:

cokemachineglow:

Camp Lo :: “Luchini”
Uptown Saturday Night (1997)

Seriously might be the greatest hip hop song of the 90s. It never gets old.

16 February 2014 reblog: cokemachineglow


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(Source: promieniowanie, via crocket)

16 February 2014 reblog: promieniowanie


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3 June 2011 reblog: youmightfindyourself


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14 May 2010


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11 May 2010


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youmightfindyourself:

“I’m thirty years old and I only made $600 last year.” (via skidnee/gerry canavan)

24 April 2010 reblog: youmightfindyourself


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youmightfindyourself:

Sky burial or ritual dissection was once a common funerary practice in Tibet wherein a human corpse is cut in specific locations and placed on a mountaintop, exposing it to the elements or the mahabhuta and animals – especially to birds of prey. The location of the sky burial preparation and place of execution are understood in the Vajrayana traditions as charnel grounds. In Tibet the practice is known as jhator (Tibetan: བྱ་གཏོར་; Wylie: bya gtor), which literally means, “giving alms to the birds.”

The majority of Tibetans adhere to Buddhism, which teaches rebirth. There is no need to preserve the body, as it is now an empty vessel. Birds may eat it, or nature may let it decompose. So the function of the sky burial is simply the disposal of the remains. In much of Tibet the ground is too hard and rocky to dig a grave, and with fuel and timber scarce, a sky burial is often more practical than cremation.

If you want to see how it works, click here. Though I warn you, it’s gruesome.

22 April 2010 reblog: youmightfindyourself


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crappytaxidermy:

polly morgan, 2010 armory show

20 April 2010 reblog: crappytaxidermy


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Cha-chinnnng

In 2006, the United States Census Bureau determined that there were nearly 1.5 billion credit cards in use in the U.S. A stack of all those credit cards would reach more than 70 miles into space — and be almost as tall as 13 Mount Everests.

(Source: NY Times, Feb. 23, 2009)

20 April 2010


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